In Memoriam: Maryori Conde, IRT ’17

By Leislie Godo-Solo, IRT ’91
Education Programs Specialist, IRT

I first met Maryori Conde in November of 2016 during our discussion about her interest in IRT. During our short interaction, it was abundantly clear that she was tremendously passionate about educational access and teaching—she embodied the term educator. She became a teaching fellow at Breakthrough Providence and integrated social justice concepts into the curriculum which she taught to seventh graders. Carlon Howard, co-director of Breakthrough Providence states that“she was a very caring and passionate person, someone who believed in our mission.  Someone who always had a positive demeanor about herself, who always came with a smile.”

Conde photo Continue reading “In Memoriam: Maryori Conde, IRT ’17”

Profile: Brighid Dwyer, IRT ’01

Redefining networking
I used to think of networking as a “dirty” word that conveyed images of people wearing stiff suits, holding cocktails, and pretending to be someone they are not in order to get a job or secure money for a business deal. While this is still a pervasive image that comes to mind when I think about networking, the IRT has caused me to think about networking in much more applicable, authentic, and holistic way. This is because the IRT focuses on the authenticity of the network, not the false pretenses that come with hollow actions of networking.

Continue reading “Profile: Brighid Dwyer, IRT ’01”

University of Washington Joins the IRT Consortium

UW logo

The IRT is very pleased to announce that the University of Washington (UW) has joined our consortium. The UW offers more than 110 graduate degrees through 370 graduate programs, from master’s degrees for people launching or continuing their careers to doctoral degree programs for those pursuing academic, research or professional careers. Additionally, the University of Washington College of Education offers a range of graduate and professional degrees for future teachers, researchers, leaders and policymakers. Located in Seattle, the College is dedicated to transforming inequitable systems of education to create just, sustainable and culturally-thriving democracies by engaging in dynamic, collaborative partnerships, practices and research.

“We extremely excited about our budding partnership with IRT. A number of our faculty have worked with IRT students through other institutions. They rave about them. We think the students will find UW an excellent place to take the next steps in their education. This is a win-win!”

Patrick Sexton, Assistant Dean of Teacher Preparation
University of Washington

 

IRT featured on Every Quarter Podcast

 

How do we educate our society as it continually evolves?

The Institute for Recruitment of Teachers seeks to answer this question. Founded in 1990 by Kelly Wise, the IRT has a nearly 30-year history of producing social justice–minded educators in both  K–12 and the professoriate.

In this episode of Every Quarter, we sit down with the LaShawnda Brooks, the new executive director of the IRT, and Jessica Acosta–Chavez ’06, IRT ’12, Phillips Academy’s associate director of admission and outreach. As an alumna of both the IRT and Phillips Academy, Acosta–Chavez is uniquely positioned to speak with Brooks around the history of the IRT, current needs in educating diverse populations, and new possibilities for the IRT.

As American demographics change, so does our need for educators. According to the Learning Policy Institute, people of color constitute nearly 40 percent of the population and 50 percent of our students.

Since the IRT’s founding in 1990, the percentage of K–12 educators of color has increased from 12 percent to 20 percent. Currently, more than 2,000 IRT alumni have received a Master’s degree and more than 330 IRT alumni have earned doctoral degrees.

Awendela Grantham, IRT ’05 shares commentary on new book

Grantham, AwendelaIRT alum shares commentary on her new book—The Africana Experience:  We’ve Come This Far.

“At Virginia Commonwealth University, I developed a more efficient way to engage undergraduates in my research. I wrote an educational textbook (an interactive eBook) called—The Africana Experience: We’ve Come This Far.” 

 

This is the book I wanted to read as an undergraduate!

Continue reading “Awendela Grantham, IRT ’05 shares commentary on new book”